A walk along Speeton Sands in the sun, the rain and ever present wind…

Another wild night with pretty torrential (and noisy) rain kept as awake until the wee hours, when it either eased up a bit or we just got used to it and finally nodded off. It was still pretty miserable as we went for our morning walk around the large section of the site which is closed until busier times, there is a sizeable dog walk on site but this area is pretty waterlogged at the moment and as Poppydog still refuses to be towelled down without a fight, I prefer her not to get too soggy in the mornings.

By lunchtime the current batch of wet stuff and wind seemed to have passed on through so we headed to Reighton Sands with it’s small carpark and clambered down what is left of the footpath, mostly now a raging muddy stream onto the beach.

Reighton Sands

This time we ventured southwards onto Speeton Sands

Speeton Sands

Both beaches are at the southern end of Filey Bay a stretch of some 5 miles of low tide sand. Speeton Sands was pretty deserted and sheltered enough by Flamborough Head and Reighton Cliffs to make ball throwing an option – so we did…

Poppydog in flight
There she goes…

At the far end of the beach, the heavens decided we were having way too much fun and shed a bucket load of tears, whipping up a nice little flurry of wind to ensure we got a proper soaking – thanks! Still this was a bit of a bonus…

Our pot of gold….

Time to head back up the beach and chase a little sunshine after the storm before it bobbed down behind the cliffs for the day.

A little sunshine and a lot of blue sky, oh yes and one damp dog!

A bit blowy on South Sands in Bridlington….

Well at last, with Storm Dennis raging outside, a long overdue return to this blog, my excuse – well just blogged out I guess! I shall endeavour to catch up the missed blogs over the coming weeks and they will be back dated to reflect the actual dates.

However, today has been pretty much as awful as forecast, though having just watched the news, I again appear to be quite jammy, just sitting above the tranch of horrendous rain that is causing such devastation elsewhere. We opted for a shortish walk along the South Sands of Bridlington.

South Sands looking towards Bridlington
Looking south away from the town

A lovely long stretch of sand but open to the full force of the wind, such that walking away from the town, almost due south west was nigh on impossible!! Unsurprisingly away from the town the beach was deserted so Poppydog was able ‘run free’….

Born to run free…

As well as being lovely to see it means that I don’t have to walk so far, a bit of a bonus especially today as not only is it tough going but there is a fair bit of sand in the air getting in your face and eyes! So after an exhilarating hour or so we were quite happy to call it a day and return to our cozy little den.


Thought of the day…

Surprisingly the site has filled up during the afternoon, I certainly wouldn’t have wanted to tow today!

A walk along Saltburn-by-the-sea and up Huntscliff to the ‘Charm Bracelet’ sculpture….

Again a rainy night, but a dry and grey day, so all is good. Today we are bound for Saltburn-by-the-Sea and what a delightful Victorian seaside resort it turned out to be. At the far end of the 8 mile sandy beach we have been following for the last couple of days, starting at the South Gare Breakwater at Tees Mouth. The town is set up on the cliff tops looking down on the few houses that make up Old Saltburn and the towering Huntscliff to the south…

And the long beach towards Marske-by-the-Sea and beyond to the north…

Unluckily for us the funicular cliff tramway (the oldest of it’s kind) was not operational today so it was the steps lots of them (both ways!).

We wandered along the beach for awhile (a few too many around for Poppydog ‘off road’) Poppydog happy chasing stones and posing in front of the row of brightly coloured beach huts sitting on the lower Promenade.

Intrigued I decided we would take a walk up and along Huntscliff, a vertical sea cliff of some 365ft at the southern end of Saltburn-by-the-sea Beach.

So up the steps (lots of) we went, pausing to catch our breath and take in the view…

The footpath was pretty muddy and slippery but fortunately quite wide and not too close to the edge of the cliff! Even on this dull day the views out to sea were pretty spectacular….

Intermittently along the cliff edge where a couple of slates, one warning of the danger of crumbling edges and sheer drops and the other a positive ‘We love you’ message – sadly an indicator that not all visitors are walking the cliffs for the view. I met the chap who was responsible for these slates, a retired Coastguard who walks the cliffs every day, checking his signs and generally looking out for vulnerable people, what an amazing man and a simple but lovely idea.

On our way again as so soon the light begins to fade and we arrived at our destination, this delightful steel ‘Saltburn Charm Bracelet’, each charm symobilising a feature of Saltburn’s heritage.

We did in fact venture on a bit further, I do often find that the coastal path is so intriguing that you just have to look arouand the next headland!

And there it was Skinningrove’s secret beach – Cattersby Sands. A place to explore another day, for now though it is time for us to head back for a quick play on the beach and a walk along the pier.

And as we clamber back up the many steps up to the car, a look down onto the beach as day gives way to dusk.

A lot of climbing but a charming resort and a rewarding 7 mile jaunt.

From Nose Point to Seaham and it’s beaches…..

A wet night and morning, but we slept in till it stopped – good plan! Don’t get too excited we were up and out by 9. Later we drove to Nose Point, looking down onto Blast Beach, where we were yesterday….

As I have already mentioned this stretch of coastline was pretty abused by the coal industry up until the early 90’s (can you believe that?) and nature is doing its damndest to recover, time will tell but even now it has a kind of rugged charm.

As we walked on down into Seaham, there is quite a bit of industry on the south side (which I guess is a good thing) and evidence of activity in the port – big piles of coal? and scrap metal? Ugly but again a good thing if it means employment.

The outskirts were pretty grim with scrubby litter strewn areas but once you got into town you could see that areas were being regenerated and in some places looking sucessfully thriving. Down by the marina, aside from this sculpture dedicated to the lifeboat crews….

There were a number of little shops and cafes and a nice atmosphere with this harbour beach a bit of a bonus…

Just beyond the harbour wall is The Slope beach a small stone and shingly sand crescent shaped beach…

Around the headland (Featherbed Rocks) at the start of the Promenade was probably the nicest memorial garden I have seen….

Shortly we were looking down onto Seaham Beach a long beach with a mix of stone, sand and shingle….

We wandered along the lower promenade which judging by all the stones strewn across it is frequently battered by the waves and joined the beach a little further on, out of the reach of the incoming tide.

Too busy with Sunday afternoon walkers and sea glass hunters – from 1850 to 1921, Seaham was home to the largest bottle making plant in the UK, with all the waste glass ending up in the sea and now much sought after (pity the same can’t be said for the coal waste dumped along this coastline too!).

Poppydog and I enjoyed a leisurely stroll along the beach before returning the way we came. The sun coming out and just catching the waves though too low to catch the beach.

The sun also glinting off this sculpture ‘The 3 Pits’ (took a bit of figuring out but essentially the profile of the 3 pits that previously stood along this coastline).

It has a way to go big it is good to see an area coming back to life and made for a pleasant Sunday afternoon 7 mile walk.

A riverside walk for us today…

A wet night and pretty miserable start to the day though fortunately the rain moved on by lunchtime. Not wishing to get caught up in the Friday afternoon traffic (no matter where we go we have to use the busy A19 or A66) we decided to just take a walk along the river. We took the riverside walk along the south side of the river heading towards Stockton-on-Tees. It isn’t particularly an interesting walk as the riverside properties are either new housing, modern University Campus or modern office units, all very boxy in style and even the area built around a sort of mini Venice lacks any charm…

Bridges are in my opinion the only eye catching features….

Never mind a pleasant enough 6 mile walk ending back at the Tees Barrage.

Bearing in mind that we walk along the river every morning and thus is our second extended walk along the river we have only seen the odd canoe using the river – what a shame where are all the other boats?